On fantasy and my love of it

I have yet to post about one of my favourite genres of book: fantasy. Yes I did recently write about Game Of Thrones but it is surprising that it has taken me such a long time to get around to this hugely incorporating genre. I read the Riftwar saga by Raymond E. Feist a few years ago now, but I have been thinking about it a lot recently and so here it belongs.

For those of you that are not into the dragons and chivalry, swordsmen and ogres, dwarves and elves then honestly I don’t know what to say. In my opinion reading is a method of escapism, whether you read a book set in Afghanistan or one set in an invented world full of mythical creatures they both fulfil their purpose: to escape. Fantasy is a realm of fiction that really grabs escapism by the reins and throws them out the window. I hear many people justify their dislike of fantasy with “there is too much unnecessary description, to the point where it is just no longer believable.” But can this not also be said for any classic? The older you get, the more descriptive you get; and in a round about way, fantasy is often set in a world comparable to the middle ages.

magician

This particular saga really is brilliant. The first in the opening trilogy is Magician and although a lengthy volume, is thoroughly enjoyable and fled by in no time at all. I remember feeling almost cheated by Feist after I saw that the second and third books were a third of the size. It can be incredibly difficult to create a setting for your story, let alone a whole world. It is very easy to write too much, use too many of those things we call adjectives and really force those sceptics to jump for joy at yet another failure. Or go the other way and fail at any description of any sort, no character depth or believability. But Feist got the balance perfect I felt. The various cities in Midkemia (the main invented world) in the novel felt so real that I wanted to dive into the page and join the fight. What I liked most was that because it was the Riftwar saga, it not only held one world but to joined by this rift. It really was a brilliant twist to a fantasy novel – a little bit of sci-fi to get everything going.

Yes there is a very heavy male presence throughout the books, but that is expected of these novels. I am not condemning them, or even agreeing that this is right, just that it was what was thought necessary for the book to be successful. There are some brilliant female characters in the novel, very powerful and fiery young women who are determined to get their own way. The male characters are just as excptional, and they range from all different walks of life. They don’t just focus on a poor orphan boy who raises to power like the majority of novels, but we also discover plot from those of wealth, nobility, power and the humble. Martin Longbow particularly tugged at my heart strings, he was such a believable character and I really felt myself spurring him on and happy when he finally found happiness.

But the best character has to be Jimmy the Hand. He is so brilliant in fact, that Raymond E. Feist even wrote a separate book just about him to accompany the saga. He is nothing more than flea-ridden gutter rat, scuttering along and stealing where he can to get by. But he becomes so much more than that as the story develops.

The stories are written through the eyes of various characters and so as the plot progresses the characters change and alter depending on the circumstances. So for those of you who are new to fantasy, a bit reluctant after watching Lord of the Rings and not particularly enjoying it, in my opinion you cannot make a judgement about fantasy as a whole until you have read one of the books. Give it a go. The dragons aren’t real so there is nothing to fear!

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One thought on “On fantasy and my love of it

  1. Pingback: Far too much work, and a new novel | Jeremy Szal's Galaxy Blog

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